pk10开奖结果

Recent Press Releases

Members of the media can contact the Arbuthnot Banking Group for further information or to arrange an interview. We will respond to all enquiries as soon as possible.

The coronavirus crisis: economic costs mount up as the lockdown continues

Date: 27th April 2020

The coronavirus crisis: economic costs mount up as the lockdown continues
In this Perspective Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser to the Arbuthnot Banking Group, discusses the mounting economic costs as the lockdown continues:
    • Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab announced that lockdown (introduced 23 March) would be extended for at least another three weeks on 16 April. A second review of the measures can be expected on 7 May.
    • March’s retail sales fell 5.1% (MOM), the largest fall since the series began. They fell 1.6% (QOQ) in 2020Q1.
    • Survey evidence continues to show deteriorating activity. Market’s flash UK composite output index collapsed in April to 12.9, compared with March’s 36.0. The collapse was led by services.
    • The ONS’s Business Impact of Coronavirus Survey (BICS) reported that 24.3% of respondents had said they had temporarily closed or paused trading, while 75.4% were continuing trading. 0.3% had permanently ceased trading.
    • The OBR, in its coronavirus scenario, estimated that public sector net borrowing (PSNB) would increase by £218bn in FY2020 relative to their March Budget forecast (to reach £273bn or nearly 14% of GDP), before falling back close to forecast in the medium term
    • The Debt Management Office (DMO) announced that planned gilt sales would total £180bn over the May-July three-month period based on the government’s assessment of its financing requirements.
    Internationally:
    • Markit PMIs for the Eurozone and the US deteriorated markedly in April.
    • The IMF forecast that world GDP would contract by 3% in 2020 (compared with growth of 3.3% in the January forecast), much worse than during the 2008-09 financial crisis. They projected a 6.5% (YOY) fall in the UK’s GDP for 2020.
    • Oil prices continued to weaken in April overall, on weak global demand. The International Energy Agency (IEA) forecast that global oil demand would plunge by a record 9m barrels a day (BPD) in 2020 (YOY), erasing almost a decade’s worth of growth.
    UK data update:
    • With the exception of March’s retail sales (see above), most of the ONS’s recent releases have related to pre-coronavirus conditions and are, therefore, not good indicators of where the economy can be expected to go over the next few weeks and months.
    • Inflationary pressures remain well contained, with the latest indicators benefiting from the weakness of oil prices. The CPIH inflation rate slipped to 1.5% in March, compared with February’s 1.7%, helped by lower prices for motor fuels and clothing.
    • Labour market data for the three months to February indicated a robust labour market prior to coronavirus outbreak.
    • Public sector net borrowing (PSNB) in FY2019 was £48.7bn, some £9.3bn higher than in FY2018. The ONS said it was likely to be revised higher.
    Brexit up-date:
    • The second round of UK-EU negotiations about the Future Relationship took place 20-24 April. Afterwards, the UK government highlighted “significant differences of principle” in areas including the “level playing field” (of regulations) and fisheries.
    Ruth Lea said, “We remain in unknown territory. As the lockdown enters the sixth week, the economic and social implications of the coronavirus crisis, and the Government’s response to contain it, are becoming a little clearer. Retail sales fell over 5% in March, and can be expected to fall further in April, Markit’s flash composite indicator collapsed in April and the ONS’s latest BICS results made for worrying reading. Beyond the data, the OBR’s “coronavirus scenario” suggested public sector borrowing could be around £275bn (nearly 14% of GDP) in FY2020. Debate is increasingly focussing on the timing and shape of the Government’s exit strategy. In the meantime economic activity can only be severely curtailed, damaging businesses and employment prospects and putting pressure on the public finances.”

For full story: http://www.djlkxw.com/economic_perspectives_group.html

Press enquiries:

Arbuthnot Banking Group PLC:

Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser
07800 608 674, 020 8346 3482
ruthlea@arbuthnot.co.uk
Follow Ruth on Twitter @RuthLeaEcon

Maitland:
Sam Cartwright
020 7379 4415
Jais Mehaji
020 7379 5151
arbuthnot@maitland.co.uk
In this Perspective Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser to the Arbuthnot Banking Group, discusses the coronavirus pandemic and its economic implications:
    • The Government’s response to the increasingly severe coronavirus pandemic has been to introduce increasingly strict curbs on activity in order to contain the spread of the disease. These restrictions have already had, and will continue to have, profound implications for business and the economy.
    • It is currently impossible to say how long the current intensity of the restrictions will continue or, indeed, when the worst of the pandemic in the UK will be past. However, Sir Patrick Vallance (Government Chief Scientific Adviser (GCSA)) commented on 12 March that the peak could be “10-14 weeks ahead”, accompanied by a graph suggesting the worst of the outbreak would be over by Autumn 2020.
    • It will be some weeks before the ONS releases any indicators relating to March. But, in the meantime, Markit recently released its flash UK composite output index for March which showed a very sharp decline in activity – to a record low (the series began in 1998). The index implied contraction in 2020Q1. Moreover, Markit expect the decline to accelerate in 2020Q2.
    • Markit’s findings were broadly supported by the latest Bank of England Agents’ summary (for example), which concluded “…the Covid-19 (Coronavirus) pandemic has caused a sudden, rapid decline in economic activity in recent weeks”.
    • Given this information it now seems all but inevitable that the UK will experience a recession in the first half of 2020.
    • Given the enormous unknowns, a scenario-building approach to projecting GDP is probably the most constructive way forward. Assuming that the worst of the outbreak is over by the Autumn and that measures of the Government and the Bank of England are effective in mitigating the worst of the down-turn, it is reasonable to expect the beginnings of recovery in the second half of 2020 after a very sharp contraction in the first half of 2020. We also assume that there will be some significant relaxation of the severe restrictions introduced on 23 March 2020 in April-May. Overall GDP could fall 2½-3% in 2020.
    • This scenario is broadly in line with the MPC’s assessment that there will be a large and sharp reduction in activity, but it should prove temporary.
    Support measures by the Treasury and the Bank of England:
    • The Chancellor has announced four significant packages of measures: in the Budget (11 March, including the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme), 17 March (including the Covid Corporate Financing Facility), 20 March (including the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme) and 26 March (for the self-employed).
    • The Bank of England’s measures include: cuts in the Bank Rate (to 0.25% on 11 March and to 0.1% on 19 March), the introduction of the Term Funding scheme for SMEs and an increase in Bank’s holdings of UK government and corporate bonds by £200bn (to £645bn).
    Internationally:
    • In the US, the Fed cut the target range for Fed Funds again on 15 March (to 0-0.25%) and the Senate and the White House agreed a $2 trillion stimulus package on 25 March.
    • The ECB announced a new Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP), with overall envelope of €750bn, on 18 March.
    The pandemic has had major impact on the markets, including:
    • The equity markets, with the FTSE100 dropping from around 7,500 in the first half of February to a recent low of under 5,000 on 23 March, ending last week at around 5,500.
    • Sterling has weakened since the beginning of the year, reflecting the flight to relative safe havens (including the dollar) as well as the perceived, specific vulnerability of sterling, reflecting the UK’s need to finance its current account deficit.
    • Oil prices have collapsed from $65pb (Brent crude) at the start of the year to $25pb by 27 March, on falling demand, exacerbated by disagreements between Saudi Arabia and Russia.
    Other news:
    • The ONS’s recent releases have related to January and February and are, therefore, not good indicators of where the economy can be expected to go over the next few weeks and months. The labour market data were robust, whilst inflation looks well-contained.
    • The UK-EU Brexit talks are expected to continue in the forthcoming week, by video link.
    Ruth Lea said, “We are in unknown territory. The indicators we have, however, point to a fall in GDP in 2020Q1 and a very sharp contraction in 2020Q2. Recession, therefore, looks all but inevitable. If, however, the worst of the outbreak is indeed over by Autumn and the measures announced by the Treasury and the Bank of England mitigate the worst of the down-turn, the economy should start to recover in the second half of 2020. Under these circumstances, there would be a sharp V-shaped recession. Comparisons are being made with the Great Recession of 2008-2009 and it could well be, indeed it is likely, that the initial contraction in the economy is sharper that in 2008. But the Great Recession was characterised by a highly damaging, protracted U-shaped recession, which we do not expect this time”.

For full story: http://www.djlkxw.com/economic_perspectives_group.html

Press enquiries:

Arbuthnot Banking Group PLC:

Ruth Lea, Economic Adviser
07800 608 674, 020 8346 3482
ruthlea@arbuthnot.co.uk
Follow Ruth on Twitter @RuthLeaEcon

Maitland:
Sam Cartwright
020 7379 4415
Jais Mehaji
020 7379 5151
arbuthnot@maitland.co.uk
北京赛车pk10投注 北京赛车pk10投注 北京赛车PK10开奖直播历史记录 pk10开奖结果 北京赛车app pk10开奖结果北京赛车PK10开奖直播历史记录 北京赛车pk10投注 北京赛车pk10投注 pk10开奖记录 北京赛车pk10投注